The Making of a Psyop: Did the "X-Files" Spin-Off Series "The Lone Gunmen" Predict 9/11 in March 2001?

The show aired March through June 2001 and was then cancelled due to "ratings."

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This clip, posted by TikTok user hypnolysis, is from the X-Files spin-off series The Lone Gunmen. In the clip, the characters discuss a factional government plot to fly a plane into the World Trade Center - months prior to the actual events of 9/11.

This episode in particular was the pilot episode of the series (we see what you did there) which originally aired March 4, 2001. Wikipedia provides the following synopsis among the episode notes: “While the Lone Gunmen are thwarted in their attempt to steal a computer chip by Yves Adele Harlow, Byers receives news of his father's death, and the trio soon find themselves unraveling a government conspiracy concerning an attempt to fly a commercial aircraft into the World Trade Center, with increased arms sales for the United States as an intended result.”

Cultural impact: Over 13 million viewers watched the pilot episode.

The series, created by Chris Carter, Vince Gilligan, John Shiban, and Frank Spotnitz, only aired March through June 2001 and was then cancelled by FOX executives, citing a drop in Nielsen ratings as the reason for the show’s “failure.”

Presumably, the show may have served its purpose and may have no longer been necessary past the initial media buy. You can see similar activity outlined in emails uncovered between Hollywood and DC during the Sony hack. Once a film or television show has served its purpose in corralling public opinion in a certain direction, DC funding is revoked and the show, no longer lucrative to Hollywood, is then cancelled.

With predictive programming, remember, it's usually not the true story that is being pushed, but the perception of the story that the controllers would like you to adopt once the psyop event actually occurs.

Your reaction to the false story constructed in support of the psyop is being preprogrammed for you.

Most are more likely to accept what has already been established culturally as a familiar narrative than they are to question that familiar narrative and venture into the unknown.

If anyone does happen to venture off in that direction, the rest are programmed to ridicule and ostracize the dissenter until the dissenter agrees to bring their opinions back into the fold.