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Thank you, Demi, I've never looked at the new wave of alternative artists as a con of huge proportions. I don't have a lot of cash in the coffers, but sometimes things catch my eye, like a shiny canpull to a magpie, everything's got value to somebody sort of way.

Something I have noticed for my own admiration of modern art is the humour and poetry in it. Which, having read that back, sounds as up my own arse as I can reach. But honestly something needs to be sharp in its execution and ironic in its essence for me to part with anything over a hundred squid.

I love modern art, but ultimately noone can tell anyone else what to like, but just respect, and listen to other's point of view...it makes the suggestion that modern art is codswallop all the more likely now you've condemned it Demi, and in future purchases I will test them against your, 'this is shit' barometer. But if a piece speaks to me and makes me laff, sometimes I make a home for it in my bank balance. ❤️ x

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If it resonates with you and you love it, why not? There are plenty of artists that bring the kind of resonance you're describing to the table, and if they are genuinely performing an exploration into some aspect of the human condition, then they are absolutely bringing something real to the table. Many artists have no idea this is even happening, especially the ones who are genuinely attempting to scrape by and make a living. It's the x million dollars for a blank canvas kind of trash that you'd really need to be worried about. Enjoy what you love!! ❤️

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Thank you, Demi...if you can at some stage let me know what you're into art-wise? It may be really revealing..

I do 100% agree that Tracy Erin's weekend bed was Shute of the highest order, so I seriously agree with what you say, and to think that some 'artists' actually get into art school not by talent, but by spinning a yarn is totally true...x

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I studied art, film, and media. I tend toward anything emotionally evocative or impactful. If I'm laughing, crying, thinking, or even feeling some hard to name or pinpoint emotion from the piece, I consider it successful. Other times, I'm simply marveling at the artist's technical prowess, but to me, simply having technical prowess wouldn't be enough, even though the piece would still be impressive. If I'm not coming away from it changed by it, I'm not going to remember it because memory is connected to emotional resonance. In my room, prominently placed, is a map I printed on canvas. It's just a map - or, when it was made, it would have just been a map devoid of context. But what it represents now makes me cry for the loss of our roots and our history and this map is one of the things that first woke me up. I have a habit of anchoring feelings to objects. So I kept it. I look at it every day. And I remind myself of the history and context we've lost. It was never meant to be art.... not in the way we think of art traditionally; however, the map maker was a talented artist and cartographer. But the story it conveys to me is what matters... the emotion it evokes and what it represents as an object anchoring an emotion. I see it and I think, "We have no clue who we are." If that doesn't define what is at the very core of the human condition, I don't know what does.

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Beautifully written, Demi, I think you may have had practice at this explanation, as it just drips off the pen! The skills of completing a degree anywhere in the world in Art will teach you how to critique a piece definitely, but when my partner, Lisa, was drawing. She knew how to draw anything...she often used me as a model, and I said to her draw my foot, there aren't enuf feet in Art...ask yourself D, can you draw a convincing foot? Xx

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I'm a filmmaker, a digital artist, and I was a special effects makeup artist. I can't draw for shit. 🤣

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Sorry Tracy Emin (bloody phone) x

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